Immunisation

Immunisation is a simple, safe and effective way of protecting people against harmful diseases before they come into contact with them in the community. Immunisation not only protects individuals, but also others in the community, by reducing the spread of disease.

We offer immunisation for following patients:

  • Children according to the national Immunisation Schedule. 
    For more details please click here
  • Individuals who are eligible for Seasonal Flu Vaccination.

    Patients eligible for Government funded seasonal Flu vaccination are

    • Older Australians (Age 65 and above)
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders people over 15 years of age.
    • Pregnant women
    • Individuals aged 6 months and over with following medical conditions predisposing to severe influenza.
    • Cardiac disease, including cyanotic congenital heart disease, coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure
    • Chronic respiratory conditions, including suppuratives lung disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severe asthma
    • Other chronic illnesses requiring regular medical follow up or hospitalisation in the previous year, including diabetes mellitus, chronic metabolic diseases, chronic renal failure, and haemoglobinopathies
    • Chronic neurological conditions that impact on respiratory function, including multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, and seizure disorders
    • Impaired immunity, including HIV, malignancy and chronic steroid use
    • Children aged 6 months to 10 years on long term aspirin therapy

    Healthy adults who wish to be immunised against Seasonal Flu vaccination but not eligible for government funded free vaccine will be able to have private vaccination with additional cost of $20.00.

  • pneumococcal vaccine
    A single dose of pneumococcal vaccine is recommended for adults at 65 years of age. Adults who have not received a dose at 65 years of age should have a single catch-up dose as soon as possible. Adults who have a medical condition (for example, cardiac, liver and congenital diseases) are at risk of catching this disease and should discuss this with their doctor as soon as possible as they may require additional vaccinations to ensure that they are adequately protected
  • Shingles vaccine (Zostavax®) for 70-79 year olds.
  • Whooping cough vaccination during pregnancy
    Free whooping cough vaccine is available for pregnant women in their third trimester (preferably at 28 weeks).
    International studies have found that whooping cough vaccination during pregnancy is safe and effective for both the mother and baby. Vaccination is best given at 28 weeks to provide time for antibodies to be produced and passed on to the baby to provide protection until it is able to have its own vaccinations from 6 weeks of age.
    Family members and carers who will have close contact with babies in their first weeks of life should receive a whooping cough vaccine on prescription at least two weeks before having contact with the baby unless they have received a dose in the previous 10 years and all children should be up to date with their vaccinations. For more information, please see Protect Your Newborn From Whooping Cough.